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Text Post Sat, Aug. 23, 2014 548,170 notes

apple-saucy:

spookynez:

chaosprancing:

superwholockgarfield:

morgrana:

OMG so I just figured out the word “hurt”

it’s past, present and future

you will be hurt

you are hurt

you were hurt

BECAUSE IF SOMETHING TRULY HURT, IT NEVER REALLY STOPS

you poetic little shit

it’s because… it’s an adjective… …

you will be stupid

you are stupid

you were stupid

BECAUSE IF SOMEONE IS TRULY STUPID, THEY NEVER REALLY STOP

lol it’s not an adjective it’s a participle

(via optimistic-red-velvet-walrus)






Text Post Thu, Aug. 21, 2014 8 notes

on another infuriating yet unrelated note

I don’t understand why people have so much hesitation when they clog other people’s toilets and a plunger is available

like

that happens all the time

just take the plunger and deal with it

everybody makes big poop sometimes

omg srsly






Text Post Thu, Aug. 21, 2014 3 notes

just once

JUST FUCKING ONCE would I like to see my dad without him saying something that is absolutely infuriating

but nooo

literally as he’s dropping me off at my apt before he goes home

as he’s giving me a hug

he notices a girl in short shorts and a crop top running on the other side of the street

and just HAS to make a casual rape statement

when even my SISTER is standing right next to us

and I just

kthxbai






Video Post Thu, Aug. 21, 2014 61,338 notes

goddess

(Source: ryannxp, via ryannxp)




Chat Post Tue, Aug. 19, 2014 10,321 notes

Put a number in my ask - languages

  • 1: Your native language.
  • 2: Which languages you know.
  • 3: Which languages you are learning, or want to learn.
  • 4: Does anyone in your family speak a language that you don't?
  • 5: Your favorite language to listen to.
  • 6: Your least favorite language to listen to.
  • 7: Your favorite word in your native language.
  • 8: Your favorite word in your second language(if you know one).
  • 9: Your favorite word in a language you don't really speak.
  • 10: A list of your favorite words in any language.
  • 11: A song you like in a language other than English.
  • 12: If you could pick one language to learn automatically without having to work for it, which language would you choose?
  • 13: Have you ever seen a whole movie in a language you don't understand?
  • 14: A language you like, but wouldn't put the effort into learning.
  • 15: Write a short introduction of yourself in a language other than English.



Quote Post Sun, Aug. 17, 2014 12,894 notes

“Not queer like gay. Queer like, escaping definition. Queer like some sort of fluidity and limitlessness at once. Queer like a freedom too strange to be conquered. Queer like the fearlessness to imagine what love can look like…and pursue it.”


Brandon Wint (via mossieboy)

(Source: ethiopienne, via nickmonkey)





talking to my sister over the phone literally always makes me mad and I just can’t






Photo Post Sun, Aug. 17, 2014 3 notes

emnoah:

Although graphology is not my area of concentration, I still find it interesting how ones orthography can link up with persons perception or articulation of the language. As you can see here this particular barista (who’s an awesome person, she’s super kind) likes to either bunch together or link her consonant cluster. This sequence of consonants (r & c) are almost always a product of co-articulation, meaning consonants pronounced with two simultaneous places of articulation — this one involving a secondary place and manner of articulation. It varies from person to person but in this case it carried over to her writing as a visual representation. Overall, the various ways the mind links with the body in order to approach both orthography and language is pretty interesting, moreso when the influences of one system can be seen in the other :) #starbucks #barista #morning #breakfast #greentea #tea #linguistics #orthography #writing #english #name #me #newyork #nyc #queens

I’m not sure if this is so much of an involuntary graphological habit based on innate consonantal perception as it is a product of utility vis-à-vis rapid efficiency of writing strokes? At least for me, the stroke of the letter “r” would coincide with that of the letter “c” simply because the ending place of the “r” stroke is near the beginning place of the “c” stroke. In the bottom image, the barista also connected their “c” stroke to their “o” stroke, which harkens to / is reminiscent of cursive writing.
Haha. But yeah, not my area of expertise.

emnoah:

Although graphology is not my area of concentration, I still find it interesting how ones orthography can link up with persons perception or articulation of the language. As you can see here this particular barista (who’s an awesome person, she’s super kind) likes to either bunch together or link her consonant cluster. This sequence of consonants (r & c) are almost always a product of co-articulation, meaning consonants pronounced with two simultaneous places of articulation — this one involving a secondary place and manner of articulation. It varies from person to person but in this case it carried over to her writing as a visual representation. Overall, the various ways the mind links with the body in order to approach both orthography and language is pretty interesting, moreso when the influences of one system can be seen in the other :) #starbucks #barista #morning #breakfast #greentea #tea #linguistics #orthography #writing #english #name #me #newyork #nyc #queens

I’m not sure if this is so much of an involuntary graphological habit based on innate consonantal perception as it is a product of utility vis-à-vis rapid efficiency of writing strokes? At least for me, the stroke of the letter “r” would coincide with that of the letter “c” simply because the ending place of the “r” stroke is near the beginning place of the “c” stroke. In the bottom image, the barista also connected their “c” stroke to their “o” stroke, which harkens to / is reminiscent of cursive writing.

Haha. But yeah, not my area of expertise.




Chat Post Thu, Aug. 14, 2014 217,854 notes
  • friend: you speak french?
  • me: yeah
  • friend: say something in french!
  • me: je suis venu ici pour passer un bon moment et je suis honnêtement sentir si attaqué dès maintenant



Text Post Thu, Aug. 14, 2014 114,027 notes

returquoise:

When you try to think of a word and can only remember it in another language.

LITERALLY ME ALL THE TIME

One time my friend asked me what the word “dog” was in Tagalog, and I cycled through “perro” (Spanish), “Hund” (German), “cachorro” (Portuguese), and “개” (Korean) before finally reaching “aso.”

Then today at work I was chatting with a friend in Italian about the words for “forget” in other languages, and I could not for the life of me remember Spanish “olvidar” before “dimenticare” (Italian), “esquecer” (Portuguese), “oublier” (French), and “limot” (Tagalog).

(via glottalplosive)





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